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People Reveal Their Scars And How They Got Them In A Powerful Photo Project

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SHARING IS CARING!
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Scars get a bad rap. They are often seen as ugly, dangerous, criminal and something to hide and be ashamed of. In popular culture, it’s the bad guys that have the scars.

It’s no wonder so many people feel self-conscious about them. Sophie Mayenne from London, England, is working to change these perceptions through her photography project’ Behind The Scars, ’ a series of poignant photographs of people, their scars and the tales behind them.

“As a photographer I have always been drawn to raw and un-retouched work, and what builds us different to one another – and this is where my interest in scars stems from, ” Sophie told Bored Panda. “When I first started the project, I remember saying that if I could make a difference to at least one person, then I have succeeded. As the project has grown, I merely hope it will reach more people, and continue to have a positive impact.”

Her topics, often insecure and vulnerable after years of hiding away their scars, as well as the psychological trauma that they can carry with them, have embraced her project enthusiastically. “The response has been really positive – and seeing yourself through a photographer’s eyes can be a powerful experience, ” Sophie told us. “For some people the experience of the photoshoot can be very therapeutic – as they may have not shared their experiences before, and for others they are consolidating their new seen love of their scars – and body.”

It seems that Sophie’s project is certainly having the positive impact that she set out to achieve, as people are inspired to tell their narratives and shed the burden of insecurity. “As more people find out about the project – more people come forward, ” She told Bored Panda . “I hope in the future to be able to make a book of the series – that people past and present can relate to.”

“These, in my opinion are some of the best, and most honest images I have ever taken.”

Scroll down to check out some of the photos from Sophie’s amazing and inspiring project, as well as short descriptions of the narratives behind them. Let us know what you think in the comments!

The last few months have been extremely challenging as the condition of my skin as deteriorated massively. From 18 months old when I was diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa to earlier this year I was able to live an almost normal life despite my skin, it was easy to hide and easy to manage. But earlier this year it started getting rapidly worse and I am now able to …

The last few months have been extremely challenging as the condition of my skin as deteriorated massively. From 18 months old when I was diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa to earlier this year I was able to live an almost normal life despite my skin, it was easy to hide and easy to manage. But earlier this year it started getting rapidly worse and I am now able to do less of the things I once could. My confidence and self esteem is almost non existent most of the time. So much of my day is spent managing my skin or being in pain from it. But now more than ever I need to remind myself that I am still the same old me. I am still beautiful and this condition that I will be lumbered with for the rest of my life, does not define me as a person. It will always be a huge part of my life but i will never let me take over my life. EB is so rare that there is so little awareness for it and in a lot of cases it is life threatening so I’m posting this not only for me but for everyone suffering. Because of the lack of awareness, the funding towards trials and research is so limited that I probably will never access to a cure, as much as that upsets me, I only hope that future children will get access to more treatment and a possible cure. If anyone cares enough to find out more about EB, google search “Debra eb”.

“My scars are from a flame related to domestic abuse. I got burnt at the age of 29, and it’s been a difficult journey coming to terms with it. The comfort I take from my scars is they build me who I am today. I call them my most precious, and expensive piece of jewellery I own. I have survived and if having my picture taken, and exposing my scars …

“My scars are from a fire related to domestic abuse. I get burnt at the age of 29, and it’s been a difficult journey coming to terms with it. The comfort I take from my scars is they construct me who I am today. I call them my most precious, and expensive piece of jewellery I own. I have survived and if having my picture taken, and exposing my scars can help anyone else then that’s good for me !. ”

“In 1997 at the age of 7 i survived a gas explosion. I have undergone 27 reconstructive surgeries. I have always been comfy with my scars, to me they are beautiful and they tell you different narratives. They are special.”

“My name’s Tracey. I’m a 45 year old mom of two. In 2012, my GP diagnosed me with a common cold which drastically get worse. I was given cold medication which constructed me feel awful. I called 999 and someone came out to see me. They said everything was fine. Everything was fine for 40 minutes or so. I asked my daughter to construct dinner, and then I went upstairs …

“My name’s Tracey. I’m a 45 year old mom of two. In 2012, my GP diagnosed me with a common cold which drastically get worse. I was given cold medication which built me feel awful. I called 999 and someone came out to see me. They said everything was fine. Everything was fine for 40 minutes or so. I asked my daughter to construct dinner, and then I went upstairs to lay down – and didn’t wake up. My daughter called 999 and her and my friend Chyle got in an ambulance to Kings College Hospital. When I awoke, I was confused. I did not recognise my daughter or friend. They ran a CT scan and found out I had two types of meningitis. I was put in an induced coma for a month. When I was awoken, I could not speak. My daughter came to see me daily – I could hear her but couldn’t answer which annoyed me. I subsequently saw they’d put feeding tubes down my throat – I was told that I kept trying to pull all of the tubes out. I was kept in intensive care for a further two months before having a heart attack. Whilst I had my heart attack, Doctor discovered a growth on my heart valve and a whole in my heart. They replaced my valve with a titanium one – which ticks like a little clock. After the operation they moved me back to the ICU, but this time I was in an isolated room because of the meningitis and recovery. After a month I was given a tracheostomy which allowed me to talk and communicate with Doctors, nurses and my family. For a while, I couldn’t speak properly and could only manage basic communication and small talk. I determined it hard to understand others, but tried through one word answers. In April I was moved to Lewisham hospital’s neuro ward where the Doctors taught me the basics of counting, talking, walking, eating, drinking, cleaning and dressing. For the first month I could not walk properly so I was given a wheelchair – and then a zimmer frame to walk around the ward called “Frank Cooksey”. The cooks on the ward kept feeding me as I was a size 2-4 at the time – after weeks of walking around the ward, they let me walk around the hospital with family, friends and hospital staff.”

“When I was 14 I rescued a stray horse called Fly, and I fell in love with him immediately. One morning, I was feeding the horses in the field( just like every other morning ). Fly tried to kick another horse behind him, but missed and kicked me in the face, simply below my left temple. At first I was shocked, I was young and alone in a field and covered …

“When I was 14 I rescued a stray horse called Fly, and I fell in love with him immediately. One morning, I was feeding the horses in the field( just like every other morning ). Fly tried to kick another horse behind him, but missed and kicked me in the face, just below my left temple. At first I was shocked, I was young and alone in a field and covered in blood. However after a few trip-ups to the hospital the scar is just a part of my face. Now it’s been 4 years since I was kicked, the scar has created an adhesion to my cheek bone which is why is is noticeable. Although being faced with an opportunity to remove the scar, I never would. I don’t believe beauty has to be symmetrical !.

“Today I am a little angry at the world. I’m angry that it’s been 2 years and 2 days and I still don’t feel complete. I have been cut up and then stitched and stapled, but today I don’t feel whole. I’m angry that my memories and dreamings of what happened blend together with the present. It’s 2 years and 2 days and today I don’t feel okay. But I …

“Today I am a little angry at the world. I’m angry that it’s been 2 years and 2 days and I still don’t feel complete. I have been cut up and then stitched and stapled, but today I don’t feel whole. I’m angry that my memories and dreams of what happened blend together with the present. It’s 2 years and 2 days and today I don’t feel okay. But I will. “

“I started self harming when I was 13 and have struggled with it ever since. The issue with ego harming is it gets progressively worse and you end up doing more and more damage to yourself than you think is possible when you first start. It truly is an addiction and you get to a phase where surgeons tell you that plastic surgery can’t fix the appearance of the scars ,…

“I started self harming when I was 13 and have struggled with it ever since. The issue with self harming is it gets progressively worse and you end up doing more and more damage to yourself than you think is possible when you first start. It truly is an addiction and you get to a point where surgeons tell you that plastic surgery can’t fix the appearance of the scars, so the only thing you can do is love your scars so much that all the negative connects that come along with self harm slowly disappear – along with all the pain attached to the scars. My scars tell my story, and I’m never going to let anyone else’s believes or opinions change that. “

“When I was young, I pulled a cup of hot boiling tea off the counter. As a outcome, it burnt my left shoulder down to my left breast and belly. My scar has been with me since I was 11 months old – it is all I know, I don’t even remember my body without a scar. I have my confident days where I say “It’s only a scar”. I’m …

“When I was young, I pulled a cup of hot boiling tea off the counter. As a result, it burnt my left shoulder down to my left breast and stomach. My scar has been with me since I was 11 months old – it is all I know, I don’t even remember my body without a scar. I have my confident days where I say “It’s simply a scar”. I’m sure everyone has a scar. I’ve definitely had my bad days, but only when I satisfy a new face and they stare at it in abhorrence. It constructs me believe OMG is there something on my body? And then I remember “the burn” lol. I wear this scar because it is a part of me. It’s simply a scar.”

“I played with a hand gun at age 14 and it gave me a lifetime in a wheelchair. But despite what you might believe, I’ve never found a reason to be victimised by my condition. My spiritual and physical scars constructed me grow stronger, empowered. I wanted to be a tennis player, so I became a tennis player. I wanted to be a model, and guess what … I am …

“I played with a hand gun at age 14 and it gave me a lifetime in a wheelchair. But despite what you might think, I’ve never discovered a reason to be victimised by my condition. My spiritual and physical scars made me grow stronger, empowered. I wanted to be a tennis player, so I became a tennis player. I wanted to be a model, and guess what … I am a model. As a model of diversity, I work in the fashion industry representing people that have restrictions but are not limited. They love, they fight, they win, they lose. They are real and my narrative helps them to see how beautiful and meaningful they are. All scars included.”

“I was born without both radius. When I was one I had my first surgery on my right hand. One year later physicians decided to operate on my left hand. Two different physicians operated on my hands. The first operation went well. During the second operation, there were some complications. Doctors didn’t know that bones in my left hand are different from the ones in my right hand. When I was …

“I was born without both radius. When I was one I had my first surgery on my right hand. One year later doctors decided to operate on my left hand. Two different doctors operated on my hands. The first operation went well. During the second operation, there were some complications. Physicians didn’t know that bones in my left hand are different from the ones in my right hand. When I was 15, I noticed that there was something wrong with my left wrist. I had to have surgery once again. This disease is called hemimelia, and a suit like mine happens for 1 in 100, 000 people. I always had a big problem with my scars – I couldn’t accept myself because of them and other people also had a problem with my scars. Now I think that this is who I am. Finally I can feel that I don’t have to hide it, because this is the real me.”

“In the summer of ‘1 5 I was in a house fire. My clothes and way of life up in flames. I expended my summer in a burns unit on Fulham Road. My scars and scar tissue continue to change, but I have never felt more beautiful.”

a

In 2014, I was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma, a bone cancer. I had chemo for nearly a year and several surgeries for bone transplantations in my arm. They took pieces of bone from my leg and thigh. One day, my transplant break, so I had a major surgery which took 8 hours. In two years I had 10 surgeries and I have one planned for November 2017. a

a

I was diagnosed with a rare and extremely aggressive sort of cancer called Osteosarcoma when I was 27 years old. Doctora

s think that I had the tumour since I was 26. My right arm was aching whilst I was sleeping – everyone I would chop vegetables, and get dressed. I went to see a chiropractor – he moved my arm around and I hollered very loudly. He just said that …

a

I was diagnosed with a rare and exceedingly aggressive sort of cancer called Osteosarcoma when I was 27 years old. Doctora

s think that I had the tumour since I was 26. My right arm was aching whilst I was sleeping – everyone I would chop vegetables, and get dressed. I went to see a chiropractor – he moved my arm around and I screamed very loudly. He just said that I had damaged my muscle and said I was very dramatic. Unknown to him, what lay behind my a

dramatica

shrieking was something quite sinister. I was living in South Africa, Cape Town and had recently received my visa to live there. I was working with ant-sex trafficking victims and supporting abused women and children. I had just started helping out at a support group, when one of the girls approached me and said a

Hey, you don’t know me very well, but I wanted to let you know that Ia

ve had 3 vivid dreams about you in a row now. In them you come to my house, and when I wake up I feel Goda

s presence, so I really feel that you need to come to my house.a

Ia

m quite a spiritual person, and had dreamings in my childhood that had come true, so I thought I’d go and see her. The day I went to her house she wasna

t actually in. as I was walking out of her courtyard, I had a sense that her dog was going to go for me. The dog looked chilled, so I only shut the gate and as I put my hand through the gate to lock it, I heart the dog bark, and jump up to bite m, so I gently jumped back and my arm entirely snapped as I landed. My friend took me to the Doctors. I was sent for a scar and it showed that I had a very clean break. The Doctora

s face dropped when she saw my scan. she booked me in to insure another Doctor the next morning. I was in so much pain I didna

t actually question why I was find another Doctor. When I assured him the following morning he asked me a lot of the typical cancer questions – Have you lost weight, have you passed blood, and so on. He said something had been eroding my bone- my heart was pounding thinking of all the things it could possibly be. He then said those dreaded words that literally took my breath away – you most probably have cancer.”

a

When I was in my 20 s, I was taking a short cut through the local park when I realised the gate had been locked. I decided to climb up over the railings and my footing slipped, catching my face in two places. The spikes passed through my face. Fortunately the park attendant noticed what happened and called an ambulance. I feel like my looks were ruined by the accident, but …

a

When I was in my 20 s, I was taking a short cut through the local park when I realised the gate had been locked. I decided to climb up over the railings and my footing slipped, catching my face in two places. The spikes passed through my face. Fortunately the park attendant noticed what happened and called an ambulance. I feel like my lookings were ruined by the accident, but I carried on as normal. People often believe Ia

ve been in a knife attack or fight, so believe Ia

m a bad person.a

a

Ia

ve become the strong and independent girl I am today because of my Mum, and because of what happened. It has all been a part of my journey. It started when I was 5 months old – whilst taking a nap, a fire started next to my bed and I lost two thumbs. It took one year of recovery at the hospital, and 25 years to accept it. I went …

a

Ia

ve become the strong and independent woman I am today because of my Mum, and because of what happened. It has all been a part of my journey. It started when I was 5 months old – whilst taking a nap, a flame started next to my bed and I lost two fingers. It took one year of recovery at the hospital, and 25 years to accept it. I went through awkward handshakes and looks, childrena

s whispers and concealing it at all costs – which meant always using my other hand. Because of what happened, my Mum raised a fighter who is not afraid of who she is anymore. I am not going to hide it, although it still hurts when I move my hand and it is sometimes a mental struggle to fully accept it.”

“In 2014 I was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the breast, a rare and aggressive cancer. Three surgeries and two chemotherapy treatments subsequently these are the scars I bear. My recent operation was an innovative surgery which involved removal of my sternum and four rib, which were replaced by surgical cement, muscle from my back and a skin graft. It took me a long time to finally embrace my scars. They …

“In 2014 I was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the breast, a rare and aggressive cancer. Three surgeries and two chemotherapy treatments subsequently these are the scars I bear. My recent operation was an innovative surgery which involved removal of my sternum and four rib, which were replaced by surgical cement, muscle from my back and a skin graft. It took me a long time to finally embrace my scars. They document my journey and the heroism and strength I did not believe I had. Recently I was told the cancer had returned. Astonishingly I feel at peace”

“My body is a merry-go-round of scars – new ones arrive, choose a pitch and nest amongst the constellation etched into my skin. In time, some will fade until I cana

t even remember the first time I pressed my finger to puckered flesh and welcomed them to the gang. There are self-harm scars that go back further than I care to remember, some so swooning I forget that theya

re there …

“My body is a merry-go-round of scars – new ones arrive, select a pitch and nest amongst the constellation etched into my skin. In day, some will fade until I cana

t even remember the first time I pressed my finger to puckered flesh and welcomed them to the gang. There are self-harm scars that go back further than I care to remember, some so faint I forget that theya

re there until a fluorescent changing room lighting flickers them into view, others stark with mottled tissue. There are skin biopsy bubbles, surgery scars and a tapestry of tokens from happy drunken mishaps that I will never forget. Ita

s a canvas that, by and large, I have come to accept, laugh at and learn from. The deepest layer of scarring, however, always been the trickiest to tame. The scars that ripple across my body are an unexchangeable gift from an autoimmune disease called morphea. The nature of the disease means my skin will probably never stop acquiring these new buddies; instead, theya

ll come and go in shades of a

fuck youa

. There are old bruises slowly fading into a web on my belly from the first two bouts, calcified white patches that are reaching fever pitch and shiny lesions that have only just stirred. If they were static Ia

m sure Ia

d be farther along in learning to love all of the skin Ia

m in, but their tempestuous nature constructs them hard to ignore. Some days they are so sensitive a brush of fabric can send shivers down my spine and showering has turned into an odd dance I never fancied learning – jumping from sensitivity to hot water, then cold water and then to scrubbing. Although – with a little push and an attempt to see them from a true foreigners perspective – I am learning to love each one as they arrive. They are a part of me: each freckle, mole, scar, tattoo, bruise, and lesion is threaded into the rainbow suit of skin Ia

m in. So, Ia

m going to embrace each new stripe because they are a reminder of every battle Ia

ve fought in this body. As I collect new scars, I will learn to navigate each and every evolution as it arises.”

a

I was only 8 years old when I had a car accident. I was with my friend and her mom, sitting in the back seat of the car. I wasna

t wearing a seatbelt. All of a sudden a vehicle jumped out of nowhere, and came towards us. We crashed violently, the car flipping twice. Regrettably I was the one who was injured poorly – when the car was flipping ,…

a

I was merely 8 years old when I had a car accident. I was with my friend and her mother, sitting in the back seat of the car. I wasna

t wearing a seatbelt. All of a sudden a auto jumped out of nowhere, and came towards us. We crashed violently, the car flipping twice. Regrettably I was the one who was injured poorly – when the car was flipping, I broke the window by falling on it. I hit my head on the ground( losing part of my hair ), and the car was on top of me with half of my body inside, and the other half outside. I was taken to the hospital by helicopter. The doctor put me into a medically induced coma and operated on my ruptured liver. I suffered a chest and head trauma. I was in a coma for 10 days, and on the 10 th day the doctor told my mother that there was nothing else they could do, and that I wouldna

t survive the night. The day after I woke up with a 42 c temperature because of the medicine I had been given. The doctor told my Mum that I was a miracle. I have been carrying this scar for the last 22 years of my life, and it has been like a tattoo with represents a new chapter.a

Scars on my left arm are from ego damage over the past 7 years. Scar on the top right abdomen is the result of surgery to extract rib cartilage to rebuild my left ear”

a

I managed to make it from 1993 – 2014, to 21 years old having no health issues whatsoever. No broken bones , no serious sickness – then suddenly, I was having brain surgery. I was so stupidly happy not to lose that much hair when I had my 2 operations, a year a part. I didna

t even lose much during radiotherapy. I do have this line now, all the way around …

a

I managed to make it from 1993 – 2014, to 21 years old having no health issues whatsoever. No broken bones , no serious maladies – then suddenly, I was having brain surgery. I was so stupidly happy not to lose that much hair when I had my 2 operations, a year a part. I didna

t even lose much during radiotherapy. I do have this line now, all the way around the side of my head that will never grow hair. I love it. Every day I see it, and the dent in my head beneath it, and the clod where muscle has slipped and gathered. It reminds me what Ia

ve been through – and how I didna

t merely survive, I smashed it. I will be having the scar on my head a

re-openeda

early next year( 2018) – theya

re reconstructing my dented face. I am hoping for the best resulted, but also that I get to keep this pronounced, near perfect line. My tummy scar is newer. Thata

s been harder to come to terms with – but ia

m trying not to give it too much power. Ia

m owning it. My body is a collection of markings, and memories. Ita

s a map of me. Someday Ia

ll leave this world, I will escape my skin, and I will leave behind a sort of myself that was loved – so loved – by myself and others – and it will have been lived in! a

“At 18 I was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma, a rare bone cancer that predominately affects young people. Before my diagnosis I had never heard of Ewings and had no notion how much it would impact my life. Part of the treatment process involved having my femur replaced with titanium which resulted in a scar the length of my thigh. I often felt as if the scar would remain a constant …

“At 18 I was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma, a rare bone cancer that predominately affects young person. Before my diagnosis I had never heard of Ewings and had no idea how much it would impact my life. Part of the treatment process involved having my femur replaced with titanium which resulted in a scar the length of my thigh. I often felt as if the scar would remain a constant trigger of the times I spent sick to my belly in hospital, but I’m gradually learning to view them as symbols of health, recovery and a chance at a long life. I can now zoom out and find more than a sick body, but a person even more motivated in life than before.”

“My first scars arrived at 14, whilst playing a chasing game with friends. I jumped over the wall, but the wall moved and I ended up scarring both of my legs. For years I’ve been paranoid about presenting them and only wore trousers. The scars on my left arm and face were given to me by a deranged person out for revenge, the worst portion it was not meant for …

“My first scars arrived at 14, whilst playing a chasing game with friends. I jumped over the wall, but the wall moved and I objective up scarring both of my legs. For years I’ve been paranoid about showing them and merely wore trousers. The scars on my left arm and face were given to me by a deranged person out for revenge, the worst portion it was not meant for me. I got caught up in a fight where the person had a glass in her hand whilst punching me. I was only aware of it when blood was pouring from my face. I didn’t notice my arm until I looked down to see my arm opened up like a butterfly chicken. I now love me for me, ever since I started Focusing On Creating my Ultimate Self.”

“I’ve had 15 surgeries, a brain tumour, a punctured intestine, an obstructed bowel, a cyst in my brain and a condition called Hydrocephalus. I grew up without realising my body was different until one day I wore a bikini and was met with looks of pity and shock. I thought the solution was to hide them and never talk about them, but in fact, what helped me was the exact …

“I’ve had 15 surgeries, a brain cancer, a punctured intestine, an obstructed bowel, a cyst in my brain and a condition called Hydrocephalus. I grew up without realising my body was different until one day I wore a bikini and was met with lookings of pity and shock. I thought the solution was to hide them and never talk about them, but in fact, what helped me was the exact opposite. When I was 21, I eventually started embracing my scars and accepting my body for what it does. In gala of that I launched a campaign called #scarrednotscared because I knew I couldn’t be alone. I didn’t want anyone to feel isolated in their struggles with physical illness and chronic pain, and it became the perfect platform to remove the shame around our scars and our bodies in general.”

a

I was born with five holes in my heart and have been wearing my zipper since I was 2 weeks old. I had my second lot of open heart surgery at 2 years old and my third lot at 26( 6 months ago !) because my heart was too big. Oh the irony of having a big heart – physically and metaphorically! I have truly been on a heart journey …

a

I was born with five holes in my heart and have been wearing my zipper since I was 2 weeks old. I had my second lot of open heart surgery at 2 years old and my third lot at 26( 6 months ago !) because my heart was too big. Oh the irony of having a big heart – physically and metaphorically! I have truly been on a heart journey my whole life, and my scars are a reminder that I am strong and can do anything. When I was little my mothers did the worry for me, but having my 3rd plenty of surgery this year, I have really understood the strength and beauty of my scar. Ita

s me! To have an open heart is a true gift in life, and Ia

m lucky enough to have been opened 3 times. I used to not even be able to say the word scar- as if it was something evil and ugly, but now I see it as a beautiful word. The older I get, the more honoured I feel to be a part of the exclusive a

zipper cluba

and yes, as a woman, it has been hard wearing a scar down the middle of my chest, by my breasts.( one of the sexiest parts of your body !) – but the route I see it is that Ia

m so abstract, Picasso would want to paint me! a

“I was bear at 24 weeks, weighing 1 pound 11 ounces. The big scars across my stomach is where where my bowel had not fully developed properly resulting in tiny little holes across my bowel which caused septicaemia. The doctors described it as operating on a piece of spaghetti. The scar below it is a result of having an ileostomy pouch. The star shaped scar under my armpit is …

“I was born at 24 weeks, weighing 1 pound 11 ounces. The big scars across my belly is where where my bowel had not fully developed properly resulting in tiny little holes across my bowel which caused septicaemia. The doctors described it as operating on a piece of spaghetti. The scar below it is a result of having an ileostomy pouch. The star shaped scar under my armpit is where a tubing was placed in order to help feed me. The scar across my neck is where a tubing was placed in order to receive medication. My mom always reminds me that my scar were supposedly meant to shrink as I grew, but instead they grew with me as reminder to always appreciate my life”

a

I collapsed one day after graduating University and was diagnosed with a congenital heart flaw( a hole in the heart ). This was subsequently repaired by open heart surgery in 2015, leaving me with this big a

zippera

and 3 chest drain scars. In October 2016, after a successful recovery I suffered an unexplained heart malfunction that caused multiple blood clots and resulted with me struggling to walk, permanent damage to …

a

I collapsed one day after graduating University and was diagnosed with a congenital heart defect( a hole in the heart ). This was subsequently repaired by open heart surgery in 2015, leaving me with this big a

zippera

and 3 chest drain scars. In October 2016, after a successful recovery I suffered an unexplained heart malfunction that caused multiple blood clots and resulted with me struggling to walk, permanent damage to several organs, a 3 week hospital stay and emergency surgery on my legs. From this I have 2 more scars where they entered the femoral arteries by my hips. Ia

m really proud of all of my scars, but feeling proud and accepting what has happened to my body are two separate things that have taken a while to come to terms with. All of these impediments have made me a better person, and I refuse to let my circumstances define how I live my life. I hope that other people who may be living with heart problems, or going through similar experiences will look at me, or my scars and think a

If she can get through this, then so can I.a

a

I had surgery to correct my scoliosis last year. The experience of being in hospital and the recovery process was unbelievably humbling. I have a new found respect for my body. Ita

s a practical body, it functions. I can run, dance, jump and Ia

m no longer preoccupied by a

problem areasa

like I used to be. I feel so liberated and lucky to have realised how great and capable my body …

a

I had surgery to correct my scoliosis last year. The experience of being in hospital and the recovery process was incredibly humbling. I have a new discovered respect for my body. Ita

s a practical body, it functions. I can run, dance, jump and Ia

m no longer preoccupied by a

problem areasa

like I used to be. I feel so liberated and lucky to have realised how great and capable my body is.a

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